10.21.2014

Whipped Sweet Potatoes with Maple Meringue





Since the weather is finally starting to feel like Fall, I've decided to start testing recipes for the holidays. Sweet potatoes are quintessential for Thanksgiving and Christmas. Last year I made sweet potato gratin with pecan streusel, it was pretty delicious but I think sweet potatoes really shine when they're whipped and creamy. 


I have always been a fan of baked meringue, it requires minimal ingredients and can be topped with just about anything. I thought why not add this marshmallow-esque topping to some whipped sweet potatoes. 

Alex gave me a brûlée torch as a gift on Christmas five years ago, which was the perfect tool for torching this treat, however you could always use your broiler for browning the top.



Whipped Sweet Potatoes

Ingredients:
2 lb sweet potatoes
1/2 cup half & half
1 tbsp butter
1/2 tsp salt

Directions:
Fill a large pot 2/3 with water, bring it to a boil. Meanwhile, peel the sweet potatoes and chop them into 1" pieces. Place the sweet potatoes into the boiling water. Allow them to boil for 20-25 minutes, or until they are fork tender. Drain the potatoes.

Next, place the potatoes into a large mixing bowl along with the half & half, butter and salt. Using a hand mixer on medium, whip the potatoes for a few minutes until they're smooth. Place them into a baking dish, and top them with the meringue (recipe below). Finish it off by torching the top of the meringue with a brûlée torch, or under the broiler for a minute or two.

Maple Meringue

Ingredients:
2 egg whites
1 cup confectioner's sugar
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 pinch cinnamon
1 pinch ground ginger

Directions:
In a medium size mixing bowl, place the egg whites. Using a hand mixer, mix them on high until they're frothy. Then proceed by adding about a tablespoon of confectioner's sugar at a time, while beating the mixture on medium-high speed. After you've added all of the sugar, add in the maple syrup, cinnamon and ginger. Continue to whip the mixture for 5-10 minutes, or until it forms stiff peaks (similar to whipped cream).

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